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The Mighty Encyclopedia

Learn everything there is to know about running a

successful Mighty Network

Micro-community

What is a micro-community?


A micro-community is an online community made up of less than 30 members. Oftentimes, they’re part of an online course, an online coaching group, or a larger virtual community.


What a micro-community lacks in numbers, it makes up for in value. There’s a sense of quality over quantity: In a smaller group of active, super motivated members, the people inside tend to engage more deeply for longer periods of time.


Benefits of a micro-community


Micro-communities have three main benefits.



  1. Members are more likely to engage deeply. Because micro-communities are made up of a small group of people bonded by a shared goal, motivation, or purpose, members are more likely to see it as a safe space. There, they can navigate challenges together, tap into each other’s experiences, and foster relationships with each other (which gives them all the more reason to keep coming back).

  2. And that means they’re more valuable for members. The size of a micro-community piles on the value for members. They know that the interactions will be more meaningful, especially when compared to a noisy Facebook group with hundreds of thousands of members (and the built-in distraction of Facebook’s newsfeed).

  3. Micro-communities are also relatively easy to scale. A compelling community where ten people are mastering something essential together is the foundation for 100 or 1,000 people getting the same transformation and results six to 12 months down the line. They’re a great opportunity for creators to figure out what they want to offer, and how, and get better accustomed to the flow of running a community.


Micro-community examples


Here are two examples of micro-communities in action.


Mastermind groups


Mastermind groups are made up of 8 to 16 people who come together on a regular basis to share their goals, workshop new ideas, and get perspective and feedback from other smart, equally ambitious peers.


Group coaching


Group coaching is another example of a micro-community. It’s where an instructor brings together a small group of clients and coaches them together. Whether the topic at hand is yoga or test prep, group coaching allows members a dedicated space to support, encourage, and learn both from the coach, and from each other too.


Now Read: 11 Types of Online Communities That Thrive